Studio Update: August 2019

Last month, I posted photos of my most recent textured fiber painting, (Feeling) Crushed.  Please follow the link to see it.

This month’s post is a studio update as it typically takes me at least two months to complete a fiber painting.  I’m currently working on (Feeling) Hopeful, an explosion of bright color.  I hope you enjoy the progress photos.

The pattern for Hopeful’s canvas
The canvas
Choosing colors for Hopeful’s design
And the zen stitching begins

I’ve also added a bit of embroidery work to my portfolio.  I’m extremely new to this type of art (I only know one embroidery stitch!); however, I’m enjoying the zen of hand stitching much like I enjoy the zen of machine stitching my textured fiber paintings.  I call this an embroidered drawing, as the design came from one of my sketches (and the tattoo I have on my right wrist).  What I like about transferring my sketches onto muslin via embroidery is it allows me to continue creating while relaxing on the couch in the evening with my guy.  We can pull up something on TV to watch.  He reads a little, I stitch a little, and we unwind from the day.  A perfect slow down practice.

Peace – An Embroidered Drawing
The sketch inspired the tattoo before it inspired the embroidered drawing

Future embroidered drawings will be created on much smaller hoops.  I plan to add more detail and way more stitching.

Next month, I’ll share the completed (Feeling) Hopeful.  As always, If I miss my goal to complete the painting, I’ll share another Studio Update.

Have you added anything new to your creative practice?  If yes, what?

~

My art and my work go hand in hand.  I’m a Performance Mindset Coach, helping stressed out, frantic, frazzled professional slow down and reconnect to their intuition so they can get their shit together.  I’ve walked the road my clients are on.  My method to slow down was through development of a creative practice, which helped me regain my voice and led me to want to serve others in the same way.  If you’re interested in developing (or expanding on) a creative practice as a means to reconnect to your intuition, lose your stress, and improve your professional performance, please join me over at Harmony Coaching.

~

Thanks for hanging around the studio with me!

(Feeling) Crushed

Feeling crushed.  We’ve all felt this.

That deep sense of disappointment.

The death or suppression of a dream.

Despair for a perceived loss of success, love, happiness.

That sinking feeling when we’re blinded to our own potential.

When someone stomps on our heart space, we feel crushed.

When was the last time you felt crushed?  What happened?

Constructive criticism and comments are always welcome.  Please share your thoughts!

Crushed (link to poem)

(c) 2019, Hilary Clark, “Crushed”, Fiber, 35″ x 22-1/2″
Detail View
(c) 2019, Hilary Clark, “Crushed”, Fiber, 35″ x 22-1/2″
Detail View
(c) 2019, Hilary Clark, “Crushed”, Fiber, 35″ x 22-1/2″

Next up: Flipping feelings to the upbeat.  Can’t stay down for long.  Stay tuned for my next textured fiber painting.


Info about my Feelings series: I interpret my random abstract doodles as emotions.  The guiding point is the outer boundary of the doodle.  The boundary evokes the feeling.  From there, I contemplate how to bring that particular feeling alive in fiber. 

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Studio Update: June 2019

This month, I’m sharing a studio update, showcasing progress on the latest textured fiber painting in my (Feeling) series.  Crushed is underway; the stitching began last week.  In this post, I’m sharing photos of the progress to date.

Original doodle – the shape that inspired “Crushed” as the feeling choice.
I enlarge the original doodle using tracing paper to create the canvas template
My intuitive color choices to interpret the feeling
And the stitching begins

If you missed last month’s post, which revealed (Feeling) Passionate, you can see it here.

The goal for July’s post is the unveiling of the completed (Feeling) Crushed.  If I miss the goal, I’ll share another Studio Update.

What’s your creative practice?

~

I also wanted to take the opportunity to share a bit about what I’m doing with my work as my work and my art go hand in hand.  I’m a Life and Authenticity Coach, helping stressed out, frantic, frazzled women over 40 slow down and reconnect to their intuition so they can get their shit together.  I do this by helping them to develop a creative practice.  I’ve walked the road my clients are on.  Development of my own creative practice helped me regain my voice and led me to want to serve others in the same way.  If you’re interested in learning more about coaching and how it might help you develop (or expand on) a creative practice as a means to reconnect to your intuition and lose the stress, you can follow me over at Harmony Coaching.

~

Thanks for hanging around the studio with me!

(Feeling) Passionate

Passion!  A vibrant feeling that often overwhelms and carries us away.

Passion is work in flow. It’s heart and soul in flow.

Passion isn’t contained or neat or tidy or reserved.  It’s explosions of color and light and joy.

In this piece, the color wraps around itself and leaps for freedom.

Where does passion appear in your life?

Constructive criticism and comments are always welcome.  Please share your thoughts!

Passionate (link to poem)

(c) 2019, Hilary Clark, Passionate, Fiber, 37″ x 21-1/2″

Next up: Shifting from Passion to a more subdued feeling, one that evokes an emotion from the other side of the spectrum.  Stay tuned for my next textured fiber painting.


Info about my Feelings series: I interpret my random abstract doodles as emotions.  The guiding point is the outer boundary of the doodle.  The boundary evokes the feeling.  From there, I contemplate how to bring that particular feeling alive in fiber. 

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Studio Update: April 2019

Last month, I revealed (Feeling) Woeful, my first piece of the year.  I’m working in a larger format for 2019, roughly 2′ by 3′, so it’s taking a bit longer to finish a piece (having a job and regular life responsibilities do have an impact on my available studio time, after all).

This is a super photo heavy post.  In late March, I attended International Quilt Fest Chicago (their last year here! 😦 ) and took photos of the art that most appealed.  And in early April, I was in San Diego, so I made a stop at the Visions Art Museum and I couldn’t resist taking photos of those exhibits either.

But first…

I’m currently working on (Feeling) Passionate and am sharing progress photos below.  I always try to alternate between the catabolic and anabolic feelings for my work, from “negative” to “positive”.  So from woe to passion we go.  I hope you enjoy this work.  Please let me know your thoughts in the comments below!

Photos from IQF Chicago – to be clear, none of these are my art –

Photos from Visions Art Museum, including Maria Shell’s work (none of these are mine, either.  Someday!) –

I’ll be back in a month with the full reveal for (Feeling) Passionate, or another Studio Update if my progress gets derailed.  Thanks for hanging around the studio with me.

What have you been up to?

(Feeling) Woeful

Feelings are not small when we feel them, no matter how others might try to force us to ignore or suppress those feelings into a tiny space.  Therefore, in 2019, my work will grow larger to more accurately portray the intuitive and instinctive physical manifestation of the feeling for which a piece is named.

All of my textured fiber paintings are created from intuition.  From instinct.  There is no sketching beyond the initial doodle for the outline.  There is no planning.  This is seat of the pants, gut-driven creation.

Because this is a year for my work to grow in size, (Feeling) Woeful is larger than the previous work in this series, which means more stitching, which means it took more time to complete.  Woeful is dark, as grief and woe often are.  The one bright, almost jarring, fuchsia accent symbolizes the raw pain woe often brings.

How have you experienced woe?

Constructive criticism and comments are always welcome.  Please share your thoughts!

Woeful (link to poem)

(c) 2019, Hilary Clark, Woeful, Fiber, 33-1/2″x22″

Next up: Transitioning from Woe to Passion.  Look for lots of color in my next textured fiber painting!


Info about my Feelings series: I interpret my random abstract doodles as emotions.  The guiding point is the outer boundary of the doodle.  The boundary evokes the feeling.  From there, I contemplate how to bring that particular feeling alive in fiber. 

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Studio Update: February 2019

We’re going to try something a little different this year — monthly blog posts!  Since art production has slowed due to an increase in the amount of stitching (and larger work), I decided I wanted to write here more often than just when I finish a piece.  So I’m keeping it simple and striving for studio updates every month.  And when I do complete a piece, I’ll add a bonus post!  🙂

I’m working on (Feeling) Woeful at the moment, my first piece this year.  However, I closed out 2019 doing a little experimenting in the studio.  Here’s what I tried:

When I was younger, before the age of so. many. distractions. on the computer, I used to play with the Paint accessory in Microsoft windows.  So I decided I’d recreate that experience with real paint on cotton fabric.  I grabbed some paint brushes, filled a palette with a bit of each color paint, and then began painting.  I used plain white cotton as the canvas.  The result shows above.

I’m not sure yet what I’ll use it for, but I found I really enjoyed the experience of painting.  Going forward, I plan to incorporate paint days into my studio practice, focusing on painting only solid colors – large fabric paintings all in blue, or red, or… – to then use in my (Feeling) series as I gravitate towards solids there.

My second experiment was also a return to the past:

In the early 2000s, I dyed a lot of fabric.  I enjoyed taking plain white cotton, immersing it in buckets of color, and then waiting to see how it all turned out several hours later.  It’s like dyeing Easter Eggs but on a larger scale.

For this experiment, I purchased natural dye material and then adapted the instructions for cold water dye.  The natural dyes called for boiling the fabric, or doing the dyeing in the washing machine.  Neither of those felt right to me – one, I didn’t know if the dyes would remain in the washer and then dye our clothes; two, boiling fabric on the stove meant I could only dye one color at a time and I just don’t have the patience for that.  So I decided if I was going to experiment, I’d go all out and not follow the instructions.  Turned out pretty well, don’t you think?

What I find most intriguing is the fabric appears to be linen in the photo but I assure you it was plain white cotton.  I’m looking forward to using these in a future (Feeling), which will be a departure from my usual vibrant colors.  Some feelings are more muted, and these hand dyed fabrics will be perfectly suited.

Like the fabric painting, I plan to include fabric dyeing days into my studio practice this year.  The nuances of hand dyeing create interesting colors and visual texture to the fabric, which I believe will only enhance my work.

Once we got past the holidays and rolled into 2019, I returned to my (Feeling) work with Woeful.  It’s still a work in progress and is larger than the earlier pieces in this series.  I’ve attached a few progress photos to whet your appetite for the final piece.  Enjoy!

I’ll be back in a month with another Studio Update – or sooner if I finish Woeful.  Thanks for hanging around the studio with me.

What have you been up to?